LFFF HANDMAKING HERSTORY: Feminist Uses of Craft12A

LFFF HANDMAKING HERSTORY: Feminist Uses of Craft

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Synopsis

The LFFF presents a screening showcasing the practical crafts of women from varying walks

of life, who explore through their handiwork issues of Race, Sexuality and Age.

Through their crafts the protagonists devise new methods of making themselves

visible, and question what counts as feminist practice.


BOOTWMN

Paige Gratland & Sam McWilliams, USA, 2015

Deana McGuffin is a third generation New Mexico boot maker, handcrafting wearable pieces of art. When she is approached by a Canadian artist and a San Francisco tattooer to create a gay themed cowboy boot, a story unravels of a unique collaboration that takes them to the heart of cowboy country in Northern Texas. BOOTWMN is a heartwarming, intimate and at times funny portrait of the queering of a traditional art form.


OLDER WOMEN ROCK!

Clare Unsworth, UK, 2018

Poetry-emblazoned retro clothes; nineteen older models strutting a subversive catwalk; a wild Zumba Gold flashmob. Clare Unsworth’s documentary captures this unique and ground-breaking project of older women’s liberation


LIKE DOLLS I RISE

Nora Philippe, France, 2018

From the 1840s until the 1940s, anonymous Afro-American women made rag dolls for their own children or for the white children they were looking after. Black, injured, forgotten and magnificent dolls, gathered together over the years in Debbie Neff’s collection, here lend their moving expressive features to the women that a century of slavery, segregation and racism tried to silence. Far from being the mute witnesses of their suffering, dreams and courage, these objects haunted by so many stories become, for the length of this film, the intermediaries of a discourse of self-affirmation and liberation. From Sojourner Truth to Maya Angelou, Like Dolls I'll Rise is inhabited by the voices of these women, writers, poets, activists, who brought the history of black America, and that of the long-ignored women, out of the shadows. The faces, in flesh and in canvas, revealed to us by Nora Philippe, are then no longer ghosts looming out of the past but figures of resistance, also meaningful in today’s Afro-feminist struggles.